page loader

MELISSA (LEMON BALM) OIL


MELISSA (LEMON BALM) OIL

Melissa officinalis

REFERENCES

CAS Number: 8014-71-9 ; 84082-61-1

FEMA Number: 2113

EINECS Number: 282-007-0

Paras Code: PEO1109

PART USED Leaves and Tops

COMMON NAMES Lemon Balm, Common Balm, Balm Mint

EXTRACTION METHOD Steam Distillation

ORIGIN Bulgaria

NOTE CLASSIFICATION Middle to Top Note

INTRODUCTION

Lemon Balm is attractive herb with yellow or variegated leaves smelling strongly of lemons. It is a great addition to any garden since it maintains a strong attraction for bees. Indeed, it used to be said that a swarm of bees would never desert a hive if a lemon balm plant was close by. A tisane made from the leaves, known as Melissa tea is said to relieve tiredness, sooth headaches and have a calming effect on the nerves. In this capacity, it was a popular drink with Victorian ladies.

Lemon balm is native to southern Europe and has been cultivated for over 2000 years. The Romans brought it to Britain, where it was widely grow in the middle ages, during which time Melissa honey was popular as a sugar substitute.

The plant is vigorous grower that will readily spread through the border. It reaches a height of 90 cm with a spread of 60 cm. The oval almost heart-shaped, leaves have slightly serrated edges and a pronounced network of veins; they can be up to 6 cm long and 4 cm across. The flowers which blossom from mid to late summer are small, white and insignificant.

ODOUR PROFILE

Sweet, fresh, citrus-like smell.

PHYSICAL APPEARANCE

Pale yellow to golden colored liquid.

Documents

Technical Data Sheet (TDS)

Certificate of Analysis (COA)

: EU Allergens Declaration